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Posts Tagged ‘compassion’

Principle FOUR: Attunement for Conscious Action

Monday, October 12, 2009

This is part 5 of 6 in a series of posts about the Five Principles and Supporting Practices of Conscious Social Change.

Principle FOUR:  Attunement for Conscious Action
I read a wonderful book in business school, surprisingly, about Deep Change.  We read two books by Robert Quinn, one of which was titled, Change the World: How Ordinary People can Achieve Extraordinary Results, where he examines the patterns of change agents who advance systemic change.  Quinn proposes that most of society embraces a transactional model that is “other-driven” and “inner-focused”.  In other words, individuals are driven to accomplish and attain what outer society values (e.g., prestige, knowledge, power, material wealth) and focused on results that benefit the personal good. In contrast, Quinn notes, extraordinary change agents work from an opposite, transformational orientation. They are “inner-driven” and “other-focused”.  In other words, they are driven by their own internal sense of purpose while focused on serving the larger common good. I’ve never forgotten this distinction.  And I believe, conscious social change advances the possibility of inner and outer transformation, by addressing two weaknesses of the conventional paradigm.

First, conscious social change allows us to stay attuned to the changing needs of those we aim to serve.  For example, service-based organizations can easily become attached to their core programs.  Most organizations feel the pressure to demonstrate impact in terms of concrete, quantitative outputs, such as the number of meals served to the homeless. Progress is measured by increasing size and scale, which drives the need to keep the non-profit engine funded and ever growing.  However, organizations compromise their ability to generate transformational impact. If they are not closely evaluating their effectiveness and working to re-diagnose their priority issue, they may advance their solution without noticing the shifting, underlying needs of their target populations.

In a consciousness-based approach, the same principles of deep inquiry used for self-awareness are applied to identify, understand and transform underlying issues, such as the root causes for why homelessness and hunger continue to exist. In this approach, social value creation is maximized by using deep examination and analysis of the principles of suffering to help refine program offerings to achieve transformation more effectively. Though expansion may be necessary to replicate effective solutions and bring them to scale, ultimately conscious social change ensures organizations exist only for the common good, not for their own survival.

Second, conscious social change invites us to examine our role in the systems that uphold the status quo. As institutions become ever-more integrated with cultural practice and dominant culture, they too can come to reflect the unconscious shadows of their members and the very imbalances of power that they were established to upset. Practitioners of conscious social change, thus, must rigorously examine our individual and collective role in failing to live from a place of consciousness.

Supporting Practice FOUR: Cultivating Compassion and Setting Intentions
Compassion is derived from an understanding that we are all the same in our motivation to protect ourselves from suffering.  Knowing that when people cause harm to others they are acting to avoid their own pain, can help us understand our opposition’s motivation. We also can see the interconnection between inner and outer transformation, including how we are implicated in social problems through our own unconscious patterns of behavior.  From this inner-directed and other-focused approach, conscious social change supports a diagnosis of society’s ills at the most fundamental root level.

In every moment, as we make choices to act, speak and engage with others, we do so with intention.  Very often these intentions are unconscious.  This is true not only of individuals, but of groups of individuals, organizations and institutions.  Bringing awareness to our intentions helps to ensure we are acting from a place of wisdom and clarity, rather than reacting from a shadow or fear.  On an individual level we can ask whether we are helping others because it will make us feel liked, useful or powerful. Are we protecting ourselves or advancing our power? Individually, it is helpful to review our intentions whenever we feel a charge or find ourselves reacting. On an organizational level we can ask whether we are acting in support of our core mission, or whether we are making decisions that position us to achieve publicity or funding at the expense of those we serve. Organizations should always consider their intentions and decisions in light of their overarching mission statement. On a societal level, we can examine the ways the structures we endorse uphold hierarchy and exclusion. We can investigate how society creates structures that help us collectively avoid acknowledging the suffering of the marginalized, and how society encourages our attachments to personal gain. If intentions are set consciously from the ground up, it is more likely that resulting actions, structures and systems will support the optimal path for the common good.


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